Dozens sickened with salmonella after eating cantaloupes in Canada, U.S.

Health

At least 43 people in the U.S. and 19 in Canada have been infected with an outbreak strain of salmonella linked to cantaloupes, officials say. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is warning people not to eat three recalled brands of cantaloupe.

Recall applies to 3 brands, includes whole cantaloupes, pre-cut chunks, fruit salads and platters CBC News

· Posted: Nov 17, 2023 8:59 PM EST | Last Updated: November 18, 2023

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned consumers not to eat certain whole and cut cantaloupes and pre-cut fruit products linked to an outbreak of salmonella poisoning. (J. Scott Applewhite/The Associated Press) At least 43 people in the U.S. and 19 in Canada have been infected with an outbreak strain of salmonella linked to cantaloupes, officials say.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency  warns people not to eat three recalled brands of cantaloupe: Malichita, Save on Foods and Urban Fare.

The recall applies to whole cantaloupes, as well as pre-cut chunks, fruit salads and platters containing the fruit.

So far, there have been eight confirmed or probable cases of the same strain of salmonella linked to Malichita cantaloupes in British Columbia, eight laboratory-confirmed cases in Quebec and three more in Ontario.

The agency said the affected Malichita cantaloupes were sold between Oct. 11 and Nov. 14, inclusive.

For the Save on Foods and Urban Fare products, the best before dates are up to and including Nov. 9.

Consumers who have the products in their homes should throw them away.

Some of the recalled products were distributed in all provinces as well as Yukon and possibly other territories.

Most people recover in a week The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said interviews with sick people and laboratory findings showed that cantaloupes are behind this outbreak .

In the U.S., 17 people have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported.

The number of people sickened in the outbreak is likely much higher than those reported, CDC said.

It typically takes three to four weeks to determine whether a sick person is part of an outbreak.

Most people infected with salmonella develop diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps within six hours to six days after consuming food contaminated with the bacteria.

Most recover on their own within seven days, health officials in B.C. said.

Some people — especially children younger than five, those 65 years and older, and people with weakened immune systems — may experience more severe illnesses that require medical treatment or hospitalization.

With files from The Canadian Press and Associated Press

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